What Will They Tell the Children?

by Angela Nolan

What will they tell the children?

In the generations to come.

Amerika is festering

And the world festers with her.

The wound is old but the boils and pus are worsening.

Blood is pooling just below the surface – a dark purple snake.

The orange one will quicken the fall

But it was coming anyway.

We eat too much, we consume too much, we waste too much.

Too many don’t care or are still lost in a dream of manifest destiny

That was never real in the first place.

What a ridiculous notion that one is favored over another in the eyes of the creator.

Who made up this nonsense?

What will they tell the children?

In the generations to come.

When Amerika falls it will be a devastation

But might it save the world after all?

For to succumb to the death urge of our society is to die before living.

It is to starve in the lavish lap of the earth’s abundance.

It is to be silent when every nerve in your body is screaming, “NO!”

It is to hail the chief and not step out of line.

It is to give up your woman’s body as sacrifice to the irreverent god that made it ugly.

It is to watch the natural world and too many people die unloved.

It is a procession of insults too numerous to count.

It is degradation, humiliation, trauma, pain, and loss.

It is feeling oneself as the shame of the world.

What will they tell the children?

In the generations to come.

They will tell the children that people had to take sides.

They will tell them that neutrality and inaction were participation.

They will tell them that passivity and hopeful thinking were inappropriate with wolves at the door.

They will tell them how women and people of color were dehumanized and who did it.

They will tell them there was a point when it wasn’t too late and we missed it. By a lot.

They will tell them there was only one true response.

There was only resistance – pure, visceral, instinctual, and right.

We were taught to be compliant.

And then we were taught to be grateful to our oppressors.

And then we were.

They will tell them the light at the end of the tunnel was the train.

The children will know the difference.

By our words.

By our stories.

By our defiance.

Beyond grief now. Beyond hope and optimism and happy smiling faces.

We live in the betwixt and between – the festering season.

The season when everything fake is real and everything real is fake.

The season when despots and petty tyrants have their way.

The season when the snow stops and the ocean’s rise.

The season when love doesn’t conquer all, or even a little bit.

The season when misogyny is on parade and people cheer.

The season of forgetting history, again.

What will they tell the children?

In the generations to come.

They will tell them that some chose to think with all their hearts, and minds, and spirits.

They will tell of ones who put their bodies on the frontline and of those who wrote about it.

They will tell that most people on earth only wanted to live in wellness and peace.

They will tell that the evil ones were few but gathered all money and resources for themselves.

They will tell who resisted, and who sat back and watched.

They will tell how oil, and money, and gold were everything.

They will tell how the water was contaminated, the earth raped and bled dry.

Which side do you want to be on?

When they tell the children what happened

In the generations to come?

The Seed of Greed, and Want

by Christopher L. Calkins

The Seed of Greed

Greed!

Where does it come from?

It comes from a seed.

Could it really be a dirty little seed?

The seed of greed!

How can this be in the heart of humanity?

I look out on the horizon, it seems so far to me,

surrounded by a society infested with the seed!

The seed of greed.

Who? What? No, not me!

It is that dirty little seed.

The selfish seed that turns a want into a need,

and need into greed!

The seed that our society so freely distributes like a weed!

Look and you will see

a world infested with the weeds of greed,

dropping their seeds, disguised as needs!

How can this be?

All from a seed, the seed of greed!

June 1992

Want

I did not want it this way!

I do not want it this way!

It doesn’t matter what I think.

It doesn’t matter what I say.

The rich keep on making the rules

while we the working people toil through the days.

Paying, paying, paying,

for the crooks who stole it all,

away, away, away!!!

2003

We Are Not This Culture

Michelle Jones / Deep Green Resistance

We are not this culture. We are not this society. The culture has hijacked us. This society has imprisoned what we really are.

We are water, and land.

We are the space between the trees. We are the wind and the leaves. We are sound.

We are the energy between glances of animals, running, chasing, hiding, playing.

We are animals, laying on soil, sitting in soil, walking on soil. The soil informing us of what ground is. What our bodies are.

We are sun, the warmth radiated over thousands of miles, traveling, traveling across water and land.

We are power.

We are the rain, falling, falling, landing, streaming, rushing, penetrating.

We are billion’s of living beings cooperating flooding, swapping, picking up, putting down, merging, dividing, touching, loving, hating, dying and being born again.

We are the relationship of beings.

The relationships of life.

On the road to home from Standing Rock

Jennifer Murnan / Deep Green Resistance Colorado

Thin Blue Line

Flagged two times

Curious?

“The Line is what police officers protect, the barrier between anarchy and a civilized society, between order and chaos, between respect for decency and lawlessness.”

Blue line

Slap down

Smack down

Dogs dripping blood

Mace

Tear gas

Pepper spray

Pushing

Violating your way

Breaking past

Red and Black and Brown and

Even White Protectors

Faces

Bodies

What’s left of human sanity

of human sanctity

Hellbent

for the river

What happens

Blue line

If you succeed?

Do you

Breach?

Or do you free fall

dragging all

into

a bottomless pit

of blood and oil?

Civilization conquers all.


A Prayer and a Promise

To the red and brown and black and even white protectors

faces and bodies who know no lines

those between the blue line and sacred water of life

All that remains of human sanity

of human sanctity

Peace be with you

Love be with you

Courage is in you

You are all that your ancestors prayed for

Without you our future ceases to be

Thank you

We are coming

“Daily Affirmations for Revolutionary Militants” perpetual calendars

Our friend Stephanie McMillan has printed calendars of her inspiring cartoons for revolutionaries, reusable year after year. These perpetual calendar are spiral bound with a stand for display on your desk (or wherever). They feature 365 full-color drawings with inspirational messages for those who define success as overthrowing the capitalist system. Each day you can flip to a new page for guidance and encouragement on the revolutionary path.

Order one for $27 or two for $49 at Stephanie McMillan’s store.

Testimonials

“Every time I read one of your affirmations, I want to shout it from the rooftops and tattoo it where I can see it everyday. You have a gift – and now I can pass it on. (Y)our calendar … empowers us to share something delightful and special and revolutionary – something aligned with our deepest values and vision of who we are and the world we want.”

— Michelle Reyf

“For that revolutionary who has everything – or more likely wants almost nothing, this is the right present. Stephanie McMillan’s work is clever, accessible and right on. Arm chair liberals can pass on this one; if you are scared by the artist calling herself a “revolutionary” this is the wrong desk calendar for you. If you think radical, militant protest and action is necessary to keep this world from imploding at the hands of industrial capitalism, this calendar is for you.”

— Paxus Calta Star

Beats of the Antonov: documentary on Sudan

Sudan’s ongoing civil war is not mentioned often in US or other Western corporate media outlets but has been going on for years, and currently the country is split in two. Government/military missions utilizing Russian made Antonov aircraft are carrying out bombing runs on the small villages along the borders of the divide.

The inhabitants of the Blue Nile/Nuba Mountains don’t care about government solutions or war. Since they cannot respond to the ongoing assaults with firepower, they fight back with music, dancing and singing.

This documentary is beautiful and visually stunning. Why are the so called “civilized” attempting to wipe out everything that is beautiful? From the Deep Green Resistance book: “The culture as a whole and most of its members are insane. The culture is driven by a death urge, an urge to destroy life.”

Watch the trailer below:

Rang De Basanti: a modern inspiration for direct action

Review by Parag Dalal / Deep Green Resistance

Spoiler alert: important pieces of the movie plot revealed below.

Rang De Basanti opens with a British officer in pre-independence India walking along prison cells and finally entering one. The man inside, reading a book, instructs “Wait a moment, Mr. McKinley, one revolutionary is meeting another.” Thus are we introduced to the legendary Bhagat Singh, engrossed in a book by Lenin. Singh rises calmly, ready to be escorted to the gallows. Mr McKinley, with sadness on his face, says “Sorry it has to end like this.” Bhagat Singh replies unwaveringly with a smile on his face “But this is not the end, Mr McKinley. There will be many more who will follow.” He starts walking and we see tears in the eyes of Mr McKinley.

Rang De Basanti goes against the regular Bollywood (Hindi) fare of romantic movies. It is a powerful commentary on the state of Indian politics and a call for direct action. Its ultimate clearance by the Indian Censor Board, albeit with a lot of controversy, delays, and reviews, is nothing short of surprising. The music by the Oscar winning A.R Rahman is visceral and evokes feelings of anger, rage and of freedom fighters and Indian independence.

In an interview with Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra, the writer, director and co-producer of the film said that when Aamir Khan heard the script, he immediately agreed to star in it. This is a telling fact since Aamir Khan, one of the biggest names in Bollywood, has since directed and starred in some of the most controversial Bollywood movies, bringing some very deep seated and taboo topics of Indian society to light. Amongst his films are a satirical comedy about the farmer suicides in India (Peepli Live); a story about Mangal Pandey, an Indian soldier who led a violent revolt against the British Rule in India in 1857 (Mangal Pandey: The Rising); and a story of a dyslexic eight-year old child which brought awareness to dyslexia in India (Taare Zameen Par).

Rang De Basanti is a story of four regular college going young men who are completely apathetic to Indian politics until they find themselves at the receiving end of the corrupt system. Before the main events in the movie, they are cast in a documentary about five Indian freedom fighters – Chandrasekhar Azad, Bhagat Singh, Shivaram Rajguru, Ashfaqulla Khan, and Ram Prasad Bismil. The choice of these specific freedom fighters is significant. While all of them were key in achieving Indian independence, all of them used all means necessary, including violence against the British empire. Four of them were hanged, and the fifth shot dead in a conflict with the British. While there is no way to ascertain the truth, story has it that as they were escorted to be hanged, these men wore gentle smiles, looked their executioners in the eyes, and were confident they did the right thing and were inspiring hundreds of Indians to do the same. History proves the last part was definitely true, not only during the independence struggle but also today.

In the movie, an ace air force pilot friend of the actors is killed during a practice run in a MIG-21 crash. The government closes the investigation concluding that it was the pilot’s fault, covering up the true cause: a politician bought cheap spare parts for the MIGs in return for a bribe. The young men and their community hold a rally and vigil, but the police violently disperse it, brutally injuring their friend’s mother. With peaceful protest not an option, and at their wit’s end as to what to do, they decide to kill the politician involved in the deal.

The parallels between the modern protagonists and the freedom fighters they portrayed are reinforced repeatedly with cuts to black and white clips of them playing their older versions. This vividly highlights similarities between the modern power structure and British rule. One of the most inspiring poems written during the Indian independence ― Sarfaroshi ki Tamanna by Bismil Azimabadi ― which to this day inspires countless Indians and brings up visceral feeling, is featured in the movie at key moments.

सरफ़रोशी की तमन्ना अब हमारे दिल में है

देखना है ज़ोर कितना बाज़ू-ए-क़ातिल में है

which loosely translates to:

The desire for revolution is in our hearts

Let us see what strength there is in the arms of our executioner

The youth carry out the assassination, but the elites spin the news to paint the corrupt politician as a martyr in the media. So the modern freedom fighters take over a radio station to reveal the entire truth and their reasons for killing the minister. The police declare them terrorists and kill all of them, the scenes moving back and forth between the deaths of the historic freedom fighters and those of the protagonists.

The movie had a noticeable impact on Indian society. Internet bloggers increased their criticisms of corruption and bureaucracy in the Indian Government and intense political discussions were common after the movie’s release. Young people took to streets protesting many contemporary issues and injustices, most notably the 1999 Jessica Lall Murder Case, in which the court acquitted the accused which caused intense civil protests for his re-arrest. One group of demonstrators carried out a candlelight vigil similar to that in the movie. In another instance, large rallies were organized in India and the US in response to the Priyadarshini Mattoo rape and murder case. A survey revealed Rang De Basanti as the cause of this sudden increase in Indian people’s political involvement.

The movie is revolutionary in its subject matter. The audience, especially youth, are not only sympathetic but even identify with the protagonists, average college going men. The sympathy does not wane even after they assassinate the corrupt politician and take over the radio station at gunpoint to deliver their message. The message is clear: violence is not only justified but required in certain situations. The politicians and the police force are depicted in a negative light, something almost never seen in any media, Indian or Western. The movie inspired a generation of Indian youth to take direct action and continues to inspire people to this day.

Rang De Basanti is available in the US for rental from Netflix, or purchase at amazon.com

Soom T’s “Bullets Over Babylon” Album: Tribute to Resistance

HouseofReggae.de  

Dubstep, Reggaeton and Electronique Gives Voice to Culture

Soom T (Sumati Bhardwaj) is an Indo-Scot from Glasgow who is known for her musical melange of DubStep, Hip Hop, Electronique, Reggae and Reggaeton. She’s created her own distinctive style and genre to accompany her eclectic, poetic, socio-political lyrics and versatile vocals. She also adds in other modern and world influences with her music. The genre is called several different names and hard to reduce to one label, but one that fits accurately is “Digital Laptop Reggae.”

Even more unique about her lyrics and sound are all the other musical acts she has collaborated with. Her writing, producing, recording and worldwide touring schedule is constant and rigorous and her global fan base is already huge and still growing. She is probably one of the hardest working women in the music industry in Europe and has produced more than 50 releases since 1999. She currently is signed to Renegade Masters.

MySpace.com

To get the music out, Soom T uses all the tools in the toolbox. She is online everywhere, with uploaded videos, sound bytes, photos and a presence on viral sites such as YouTube, Facebook, MySpace, Spotify, Last.fm, Bandcamp, Soundcloud and more. Her upcoming recording, “Free as a Bird” is due to be released on November 13th, 2015.

Bullets Over Babylon” was recorded as a collaboration and produced by Monkey Marc, released on April 20th, 2015. This album surprises with lush instrumentation and dedicated lyrics, multi-layered synth, keyboards and electronique. No two tracks sound the same:

  1. Aliens in Jars” — driving rhythm, looped drums, electronique, rapped lyrics, special effects with the vocals, reverbed keyboards.
  2. Bullshit” — world rhythms in the intro, rapped angry socio-political lyrics, lots of instrumentation, synth.
  3. Complex Simplicity” with MC Karma — Far East sounding strings and chord progressions, MC Karma rapping lyrics, chorus done by Soom T, yearning and melodic vocals, world music sound, some vocal parts sound Middle Eastern. Another standout track.
  4. Drill
  5. Boom
  6. Slave” — darkness, slow, minor keys, rhythmic, synth and special effects, jazzy vocals.
  7. Rebellion” with Combat Wombat — rapped lyrics, electronica, mix of dubstep and reggaeton, layered vocal riffs.
  8. Under the Bubble” — organ/keyboards intro and throughout, rapped and sung lyrics
  9. Sick of it All” — spoken intro, rapped lyrics about corporatism and resistance, great special effects, vocals about the corporate culture.
  10. Storms Come” with Marina P and Solo Banton– slow rapped reggae by Solo Banton, dancehall rhythms, Soom T’s lyrics are soft and beautiful used in the chorus and as a backdrop for Marina P’s soul voice in the verses. Outro with the sound of rain and thunder. Definitely a standout track! This writer’s favorite.
Review by Anita Stewart of Deep Green Resistance Florida, originally published at Rock at Night.

Climate Change Painting Series

Andrew Carr has painted a series depicting weatherpeople of the 2010-2014 era reporting on extreme weather events. Each painting links to further details on the event depicted.

Broken Records reveals many faces of climate change – from the slaphappy smiles of our weather prophets to the extreme weather events afflicting nations across the geographic and political spectrums.

Broken Records is a time capsule of inaction, circa 2010-2014. In 50 years, as the children of both believers and disbelievers face the long term consequences of climate change, they will wonder how we could have forecasted our doom with such sexually-infused, hyperactive ignorance.

Aesthetically, weather reports provided another opportunity to use “my colors” – the vivid, intense hues also seen in Game Shows and Prom Girls. I did not paint from still images, but rather clipped together the most apt elements of various weather reports to convey a time, a culture, and a missed opportunity to panic.

View the paintings at Broken Records.